Programs

We support the “Play Based Learning” that has been endorsed by the School Boards – Today’s Play ……Tomorrow’s Success!

Today’s play in early childhood is the best foundation for success in school. Play develops many skills that are necessary for children to learn to read and write for success in math and science. Play develops behaviors that help children learn all school subjects. We observe children playing both indoors and outdoors in different types of play. We are able to access children’s growing abilities to direct their own play. As children begin to play interactively, we see growth in their abilities to follow the rules of a game, to take turns, to share materials, and to begin to cooperate, solve problems that emerge during play.

Through play, children actively pose problems, explore solutions and develop understanding of real world concepts of form and function. By comparing information gained from each new experience to what they already know, they are actively constructing their knowledge of the way the world works.

Play is an active, child-initiated process that supports children’s learning throughout the domains of physical, social/emotional, creative, science, math, language and literacy. By taking advantage of the highly engaging nature of children’s self-sustained play, and using this as a jumping off point for a deeper exploration of the science concepts involved, staff can generate curriculum units that both integrate child-centered play and maximize children’s learning throughout these domains. By thoughtful planning and the use of significant strategies to enhance children’s play experiences, they can integrate specific learning goals and objectives for the group and for individuals, dramatically enhance children’s learning, and meet standards for preschool outcomes in all areas.

Programs offered

We offer a Toddler and Junior program. We provide excellent opportunities for each child to develop and grow to his/her potential in a fun, safe and caring atmosphere.

Toddler Program (15 months to 30 months)- Licensed for 20 children and 1 to 5 teacher to child ratio

Transition into our child care setting

Starting your child in a new facility can be lead to separation anxiety for you as parent and your child. It is very natural for your child to be upset when separating from you in the first few weeks. This is very normal and every child experiences it in a different way or different degree. Some parents get upset if their child does not cry when they leave. Some children cry for a few days. Other take longer while some do not cry in the first week but by next week their experience some separation anxiety. For your reassurance, children adjust to change easily and more so when parents leave. They do not cry all day. We do our best in ensuring your child feels safe, secure and cared for in friendly environment. We have a great group of teachers who are trained and sensitive to your child’s needs. Some children like a hug, others like to be left alone and observe the program till they are ready to join. Staff are there to support your child in adjusting and during the separation process.

For the adjustment to be easier, please come in with your child for some pre-visits by stopping by with your child as many times before he/she is registered so that they get familiar with the environment and faces of staff. You could be visiting with your child during different times of the day during your pre-visits. Explain to the child where they are going, what activities they will engage in etc. and that you will be back to pick them at end of day. By returning early for the first few sessions, your child will understand that you will return.

Toddler Program

Toddler hood is a precious stage where a child explores and discovers, is introduced to new people, places and experiences. Activities that are planned by staff are based on your child’s interests to the age and ability of each child involving the senses and motor skills. As teachers we want to provide an environment where the children feel safe and have an enjoyable and stimulating experience. The children are exposed on a daily basis to a variety of activities that enhance their learning. In our toddler program, we encourage speech, language and hearing as well as an awareness of things around them. By 18 months they communicate with ten words, follow simple directions i.e.; show me your nose, recognize names of objects i.e.: car, table. By 24 months we encourage them to interact and communicate and build social skills. They are able to use a two word combination i.e.: my hat. They can follow a two step command i.e.; put teddy in bed. They become more aware of shapes, colors and numbers in the environment. We promote self help skills encouraging them to feed themselves dress themselves, wash hands themselves. They start to become more confident and self esteem builds. They also learn to cooperate, share toys and take turns. Teachers work with the Toddlers in small groups as well as in large groups.

Skills being developed

Social skills: Basic self help skills, interacting positively and respectfully, cooperating, showing empathy, interacting with adults and children.

Emotional skills: Self concept, identity formation, self-esteem, recognizing and expressing emotion, regulating attention, emotions and behavior, positive attitude towards learning.

Communication, language and literacy skills: Receptive language skills, expressive language skills (words and sentences) using non-verbal communication and slowing moving towards verbal, understand English and child’s home language, vocabulary, conversing, listening to others, enjoying literacy, using and understanding the power of literacy, awareness of shapes, colors, numbers and letters.

Cognition: Self regulation, observing, collecting, distinguishing, classifying, sorting, counting, awareness of quantity, awareness of numbers, operations, using spatial relations.

Physical: gross motor skills eg: walking, jumping, hopping, galloping, throwing, riding, movement and expression. Fine motor skills development through dressing, eating, tool use. Auditory skills and music.

Transition into the Pre-school/Junior Room: When your child reaches thirty months, he will move to the Junior Room. In most cases a spot is available, but there could be the possibility that if a spot is not available immediately, your child could be in the Toddler room for a few weeks and sometimes for a few months. The teacher in the Toddler Room will ensure that your child will receive individual programming that is age appropriate if they continue to remain in the same room. When your child has a start date for the Junior room, a month prior to this happening, the supervisor will advise you of the transition and accordingly prepare the child for this change. Your child will have the opportunity to visit their new room frequently at different programming times. A transition form will be completed by the toddler teacher and given to the Junior room teacher. Teachers work with the Juniors in small groups. They do come together in large groups too.



Preschool and Junior Program (31 months to 5 years)- Licensed for 24 children and 1 to 8 teacher to child ratio

As your child settles in the room, he/she will be free to express emotion, imagination, confidence and personality begins to shine. Staff carefully observe each child’s development and provide activities based on their interest to expand their skills in different learning areas. A lot of social development occurs and children are given opportunities to problem solve in a respectful way using their words. We provide an environment that expands the child’s all round development. At this age, children learn by doing and observing. By offering a variety of learning experiences your child will gain knowledge of basic shapes, colors, numbers and expand their knowledge about things around them. The children are exposed on a daily basis to a variety of activities based on their interests that enhance their learning. This is accomplished through circles, musical games, role playing and sharing times. A lot of attention is paid to hand eye co-ordination, strengthening of pincer grip and small muscles. A variety of activities are provided based on their interests and that are age appropriate that strengthens muscle development like cutting, lacing, beading, gluing etc. We instill in the children the grass roots of learning and encourage them to achieve independence in dressing themselves, tying their shoe lace, feeding themselves and self help in hygiene. We encourage the children to feel good about themselves and develop a positive self image. The children are free to express themselves through painting, play dough, art work and free choice craft. They develop their cognitive skills through puzzles, sorting and classifying activities.

Skills being developed

Social skills: Making friends, conflict resolution and social problem-solving skills, self help skills, interacting positively and respectfully, cooperating, showing empathy, taking another person’s point of view, interacting with adults.

Emotional skills: Self concept, identity formation, self-esteem, recognizing and expressing emotion, regulating attention, emotions and behavior, positive attitude towards learning.

Communication, language and literacy skills: Using verbal and non-verbal communication , using English and child’s home language, vocabulary, conversing with peer and adults, using descriptive language to explore, explain and extend, listening to others, enjoying literacy, using and understanding the power of literacy, retelling stories, phonological awareness, letter recognition, understanding of orientation and familiar conventions of print, matching spoken words with written ones, beginning to write letters of the alphabet and some high-frequency words.

Cognition: Self regulation, problem solving, representation, questioning, observing, collecting and organizing skills, reflecting and reaching conclusions, communication findings, reasoning logically, classifying, sorting, counting, determining quantity, comparing quantity, representing numbers, describing and determining ordinal number and position, understanding two dimensional and three dimensional shapes, identifying patterns, measuring length, width and capacity, temperature and time, money, completing simple number operations, using number symbols and operations, using spatial relations, directions, maps.

Physical: Increasing levels of activity, endurance and variation in types of activity and skills, gross motor skills e.g.: walking, jumping, hopping, galloping, throwing, riding, movement and expression. Fine motor skills development through dressing, eating, tool use, drawing Auditory skills and music. (Early Learning for Every Child Today) – ELECT